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What is an
Enrolled Agent?

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IRS PROBLEM RESOLUTIONIRS

 

A letter from the IRS can cause alarm. However, most letters ask simple questions about information reported on your tax return which does not match what a bank or financial institution reported. 

 

But sometimes it is an audit or a tax assessment based on assumptions the IRS makes about your tax return. These issues are time sensitive and you must respond immediately. If you delay in responding you may lose your opportunity to respond directly to the IRS and end up in the United States Tax Court.   

 

As Enrolled Agents Stoddard & Associates located in Portage and Bangor, Michigan, can represent you in an Internal Revenue Audit, Offer In Compromise or Appeal.

 

Enrolled Agents are the only tax professionals tested by IRS on their knowledge of tax law and regulations, and because we are federally-licensed, the only tax professionals that may represent clients in any part of the country.

 

If you have an IRS tax issue you would would like to discuss, you can submit an online Request for Information or you can call us at 269-323-3844. We will contact you the next business day. 

 

We offer a free 30 minute consultation to all small business clients in Southwest Michigan. 

 

Frequently Asked Questions about Enrolled Agents

 

What is an Enrolled Agent?

An Enrolled Agent (EA) is a federally-authorized tax practitioner who has technical expertise in the field of taxation and who is empowered by the U.S. Department of the Treasury to represent taxpayers before all administrative levels of the Internal Revenue Service for audits, collections, and appeals.


What does the term Enrolled Agent mean?

Enrolled means to be licensed to practice by the federal government, and Agent means authorized to appear in the place of the taxpayer at the IRS.  Only Enrolled Agents, attorneys, and CPAs may represent taxpayers before the IRS.  The Enrolled Agent profession dates back to 1884 when, after questionable claims had been presented for Civil War losses, Congress acted to regulate persons who represented citizens in their dealings with the U.S. Treasury Department.

 

How does one become an Enrolled Agent?

The license is earned in one of two ways, by passing a comprehensive examination which covers all aspects of the tax code, or having worked at the IRS for five years in a position which regularly interpreted and applied the tax code and its regulations.  All candidates are subjected to a rigorous background check conducted by the IRS

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How can Enrolled Agent help me?

Enrolled Agents advise, represent, and prepare tax returns for individuals, partnerships, corporations, estates, trusts, and any entities with tax-reporting requirements.  Enrolled Agents expertise in the continually changing field of taxation enables them to effectively represent taxpayers audited by the IRS.

 

Privilege and the Enrolled Agent

The IRS Restructuring and Reform Act of 1998 allow federally authorized practitioners (those bound by the Department of Treasury's Circular 230 regulations) a limited client privilege.  This privilege allows confidentiality between the taxpayer and the Enrolled Agent under certain conditions.  The privilege applies to situations in which the taxpayer is being represented in cases involving audits and collection matters.  It is not applicable to the preparation and filing of a tax return.  This privilege does not apply to state tax matters, although a number of states have an accountant-client privilege.

 

Are Enrolled Agents required to take continuing professional education?

In addition to the stringent testing and application process, the IRS requires Enrolled Agents to complete 72 hours of continuing professional education, reported every three years, to maintain their Enrolled Agent status.  NAEA members are obligated to complete 90 hours per three year reporting period.  Because of the knowledge necessary to become an Enrolled Agent and the requirements to maintain the license, there are only about 46,000 practicing Enrolled Agents.

 

What are the differences between Enrolled Agents and other tax professionals?

Only Enrolled Agents are required to demonstrate to the IRS their competence in matters of taxation before they may represent a taxpayer before the IRS.  Unlike attorneys and CPAs, who may or may not choose to specialize in taxes, all Enrolled Agents specialize in taxation.  Enrolled Agents are the only taxpayer representatives who receive their right to practice from the U.S. government (CPAs and attorneys are licensed by the states).

 

Are Enrolled Agents bound by any ethical standards?

Enrolled Agents are required to abide by the provisions of the Department of Treasury's Circular 230, which provides the regulations governing the practice of Enrolled Agents before the IRS.  NAEA members are also bound by a Code of Ethics and Rules of Professional Conduct of the Association.

 

 

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